Classic Film Series

HOLIDAY AFFAIR (1949)

Classic Film Series
One Show Only!
HOLIDAY AFFAIR (1949)
Saturday, December 6
Saturday: 10:30am
87 minutes / Not Rated
Directed by: Don Hartman
Starring: Robert Mitchum, Janet Leigh and Wendell Corey

War widow Janet Leigh hasn't the money to buy the model train that her son Gordon Gebert wants for Christmas. Robert Mitchum overhears the boy's plight, and offers to purchase the train for him, even though it will deplete his own money supply. This little gesture of kindness from Mitchum snowballs into a series of comic complications, thanks in part to the unwelcome intervention of Leigh's stuffed-shirt attorney boyfriend Wendell Corey. Harry Morgan shows up towards the end as a flustered night-court judge who helps tie some of the loose plot ends together.

Doors open at 10:00am - Admission is $5
'Holiday Affair,' Tinsel-Trimmed Trifle With Mitchum and Janet Leigh
An amiable little romance in which a boy meets a girl at Christmas-time, and the sentiments are quite as artificial and conveniently sprinkled as the snow is provided—for those who like such things—in RKO's "Holiday Affair," a strictly holiday item which came to Loew's State yesterday. Light-weight in story and treatment, it is one of those tinsel-trimmed affairs which will likely depend for popularity upon the glamour potential of its stars. No doubt, a great many people will find this sugar to their taste. This corner finds it much too saccharine for either credibility or delight. Mr. Mitchum is quite as mechanical with his charm as is that swank electric train and Miss Leigh covers up with pouts and dimples a peculiarly shallow, selfish dame. As for young Master Gebert, he is simply not our idea of a genuine and winning youngster. However, no harm is done, either by Master Gebert, Mr. Hartman or "Holiday Affair." - - By BOSLEY CROWTHER / New York Times - Published: November 24, 1949 - -

WHITE CHRISTMAS

Classic Film Series
One Show Only!
WHITE CHRISTMAS
Saturday, December 20
Saturday: 10:30am
1954 / 120 minutes / Not Rated
Directed by: Michael Curtiz
Starring: Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen

Timeless holiday classic stars Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye as a pair of merry veterans who become famous song-and-dance men after World War II. Soon, the duo joins forces with singing sisters Rosemary Clooney and Vera-Ellen to help save their former army general's Vermont inn. Beloved Irving Berlin score includes "Blue Skies," "Sisters," "Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep" and "White Christmas".

Admission is $5.00 - Doors open at 10:00am
Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye, along with VistaVision, keep the enteratinment going in this fancifully staged production, clicking well.
The directorial handling by Michael Curtiz gives a smooth blend of music (13 numbers plus snatches of others) and drama, and in the climax creates a genuine heart tug that will squeeze tears. The plot holding the entire affair together has Crosby and Kaye, two Army buddies, joining forces after the war and becoming a big musical team. They get together with the girls and trek to Vermont for a white Christmas. The inn at which they stay is run by Dean Jagger, their old general, and the boys put on a show to pull him out of a financial hole. Crosby wraps up his portion of the show with deceptive ease, shuffling a mean hoof in the dances and generally aquitting himself like a champion. Kaye takes in his stride the dance, song and comedy demands of his assignment, keeping Crosby on his toes at all times. Variety Staff / December 31, 1953

IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE (1946)

Classic Film Series
One Show Only!
IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE (1946)
Saturday, December 13
Saturday: 10:30am
1946 / 130 minutes / Not Rated
Directed by: Frank Capra
Starring: James Stewart, Donna Reed, Lionel Barrymore and Henry Travers

Released in 1946, the film stars James Stewart as George Bailey, a man who has given up his dreams in order to help others, and whose imminent suicide on Christmas Eve brings about the intervention of his guardian angel, Clarence Odbody (Henry Travers). Clarence shows George all the lives he has touched and how different life in his community would be had he never been born.

Admission is $5.00 - Doors open at 10am
What is remarkable about "It's a Wonderful Life" is how well it holds up over the years; it's one of those ageless movies, like "Casablanca" or "The Third Man," that improves with age. Some movies, even good ones, should only be seen once. When we know how they turn out, they've surrendered their mystery and appeal. Other movies can be viewed an indefinite number of times. Like great music, they improve with familiarity. "It's a Wonderful Life" falls in the second category. Roger Ebert