Coming Soon

RICKI AND THE FLASH

Coming Soon
Starts Thursday, August 6!
RICKI AND THE FLASH
Thursday, August 6
Thursday: 7:30
!02 minutes / Rated PG13
Directed by: Jonathan Demme
Cast: Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline, Mamie Gummer, Audra McDonald, Rick Springfield

Meryl Streep takes on a whole new gig—as a hard-rocking singer/guitarist—for Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme (The Silence of the Lambs) and Oscar-winning screenwriter Diablo Cody (Juno). In an original and electrifying film loaded with live musical performances, Streep stars as Ricki Rendazzo, a guitar heroine who made a world of mistakes as she followed her dreams of rock-and-roll stardom. Returning home, Ricki gets a shot at redemption and a chance to make things right as she faces the music with her family. Streep stars opposite Mamie Gummer, her real-life daughter; Rick Springfield, portraying a Flash member in love with Ricki; Kevin Kline as Ricki’s ex-husband; and Audra McDonald as Kline’s new wife.

MR. HOLMES

Coming Soon
Opens at the Backlot!
MR. HOLMES
Friday, July 24
104 minutes / Rated PG
Directed by: Bill Condon
Cast: Ian McKellen, Laura Linney, Milo Parker, Hiroyuki Sanada, Hattie Morahan, Patrick Kennedy

Mr. Holmes is a new twist on the world's most famous detective. In 1947, an aging Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) returns from a journey to Japan, where, in search of a rare plant with powerful restorative qualities, he has witnessed the devastation of nuclear warfare. Now, in his remote seaside farmhouse, Holmes faces the end of his days tending to his bees, with only the company of his housekeeper (Laura Linney) and her young son, Roger (Milo Parker). Grappling with the diminishing powers of his mind, Holmes comes to rely upon the boy as he revisits the circumstances of the unsolved case that forced him into retirement, and searches for answers to the mysteries of life and love—before it's too late. Directed by Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters, Dreamgirls).

'Mr. Holmes': A poignant last-case scenario
For the doubters among us who still believe Sherlock Holmes to be a fictional character, consider the sad and lovely Mr. Holmes. Ian McKellen, his face weathered and weary, eyes haunted with unfinished business, clearly doesn't think Holmes an imaginary hero, an eccentric make-believe sleuth popularized in magazines and books. To watch the actor, who plays the famous consulting detective of Victorian London in the long years after he retired and retreated to the countryside, is to see a gentleman with a lifetime of extraordinary experiences moving through his days. He is absolutely real. He is also a man in profound pain: The memories of all those experiences, all those strange mysteries and exotic cases, are slipping from his mind. Mr. Holmes is about how the past defines us. It is also very much about regret and trying to put things right. Holmes, the famous logician, comes to realize, too, that there is a place in human nature for emotion, for empathy. Identifying a problem with utmost clarity isn't always the same as solving that problem. To point to the source of someone's despair isn't the same as ridding that person of it. If Mr. Holmes has a quiet, rueful aspect, the film can also be sly and amusing - and warmhearted. - - Steven Rea / Philadelphia Inquirer Movie Columnist and Critic - (three and a half out of four stars)