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MR. HOLMES

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MR. HOLMES
Friday, July 31 - Thursday, August 6
Friday: (4:00) and 7:00
Saturday - Sunday: (1:15, 4:00) and 7:00
Monday - Thursday: (4:00) and 7:00
104 minutes / Rated PG
Directed by: Bill Condon
Cast: Ian McKellen, Laura Linney, Milo Parker, Hiroyuki Sanada, Hattie Morahan, Patrick Kennedy

Mr. Holmes is a new twist on the world's most famous detective. In 1947, an aging Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) returns from a journey to Japan, where, in search of a rare plant with powerful restorative qualities, he has witnessed the devastation of nuclear warfare. Now, in his remote seaside farmhouse, Holmes faces the end of his days tending to his bees, with only the company of his housekeeper (Laura Linney) and her young son, Roger (Milo Parker). Grappling with the diminishing powers of his mind, Holmes comes to rely upon the boy as he revisits the circumstances of the unsolved case that forced him into retirement, and searches for answers to the mysteries of life and love—before it's too late. Directed by Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters, Dreamgirls).

'Mr. Holmes': A poignant last-case scenario
For the doubters among us who still believe Sherlock Holmes to be a fictional character, consider the sad and lovely Mr. Holmes. Ian McKellen, his face weathered and weary, eyes haunted with unfinished business, clearly doesn't think Holmes an imaginary hero, an eccentric make-believe sleuth popularized in magazines and books. To watch the actor, who plays the famous consulting detective of Victorian London in the long years after he retired and retreated to the countryside, is to see a gentleman with a lifetime of extraordinary experiences moving through his days. He is absolutely real. He is also a man in profound pain: The memories of all those experiences, all those strange mysteries and exotic cases, are slipping from his mind. Mr. Holmes is about how the past defines us. It is also very much about regret and trying to put things right. Holmes, the famous logician, comes to realize, too, that there is a place in human nature for emotion, for empathy. Identifying a problem with utmost clarity isn't always the same as solving that problem. To point to the source of someone's despair isn't the same as ridding that person of it. If Mr. Holmes has a quiet, rueful aspect, the film can also be sly and amusing - and warmhearted. - - Steven Rea / Philadelphia Inquirer - (3 1/2 stars out of four)

TRAINWRECK

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TRAINWRECK
Friday, July 31 - Thursday, August 6
Friday: (4:45), 7:30 and 10:00
Saturday: (2:00, 4:45), 7:30 and 10:00
Sunday: (2:00, 4:45) and 7:30
Monday - Thursday: (4:45) and 7:30
124 minutes / Rated R
Directed by: Judd Apatow
Cast: Tilda Swinton, LeBron James, Amy Schumer, Colin Quinn, Bill Hader, Brie Larson, John Cena

Filmmaker Judd Apatow (The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Knocked Up, This Is 40) directs Trainwreck, starring and written by breakout comedic actress Amy Schumer (“Inside Amy Schumer”). Since she was a little girl, it’s been drilled into Amy’s head by her rascal of a dad (Colin Quinn) that monogamy isn’t realistic. Now a magazine writer, Amy lives by that credo—enjoying what she feels is an uninhibited life free from stifling, boring romantic commitment—but in actuality, she’s kind of in a rut. When she finds herself starting to fall for the subject of the new article she’s writing, a charming and successful sports doctor named Aaron (Bill Hader), Amy starts to wonder if other grown-ups, including this guy who really seems to like her, might be on to something. The comedy Trainwreck also stars Brie Larson, John Cena, Tilda Swinton and LeBron James.

Ladies and gentlemen, meet the new face of American comedy ... Mr. LeBron James. We kid. Although basketball-star James is a revelation in “Trainwreck,” this hilarious sex comedy is co-opted by a woman whose face you may not recognize. Come behold the comic genius of ... Ms. Tilda Swinton. But seriously. Swinton is amazing as a bad boss, but she’s an Oscar winner, and her shape-shifting brilliance is not entirely unexpected. Yet nobody expected that a midsummer release could be lifted to a new level by a film-comedy novice such as ... pro wrestler John Cena. OK, OK. We’re running from the obvious, like a virgin on a date with Dracula. Amy Schumer is so scary-good in “Trainwreck” that it almost seems risky to speak her name. But we have no choice. She plays a bed-hopping boozer named Amy, a writer at a Manhattan magazine that caters to twenty something dudes. Swinton plays her barely human editor, and when she learns that Amy knows nothing about sports, she sadistically assigns her to interview the NBA’s leading knee surgeon, Dr. Aaron Conners (Bill Hader). “Trainwreck” was written by Schumer, a movie newcomer who stars in the sketch show “Inside Amy Schumer” on Comedy Central. Her blunt perspective on female sexuality in the social-network era is being treated as something new. But the film was directed by Judd Apatow so it never feels like a feminist manifesto. This is a fully fleshed-out movie, the funniest of the year. - - Joe Williams / St. Louis Post-Dispatch • 3½ stars out of four •